History of Fishing Point Lighthouse

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In 1912, a light was established at the south entrance of St. Anthony Harbour, replacing the original harbour light placed there in 1906. The white occulting light was installed in a cast-iron light tower. It exhibited 20.5 meters (67 feet) above sea level and was visible for 10 miles. A fog alarm was installed at the site in 1936, housed in a flat-roofed, wooden building. The light tower and fog alarm building were painted with red and white vertical stripes.

In 1958 a new fog alarm was installed, and in 1955 provision was made for a new landing, storehouse and outdoor toilet. A bungalow was constructed in the same year. Because the lighthouse was on a 20 minute walk from St. Anthony, the keepers’ children were able to attend school and the families could participate in social functions in the town.

In 1960 the iron tower was replaced with a combined light tower and fog alarm building, a new aluminium lantern was installed, and the acetylene gas light was converted to station-generated electricity. A second dwelling was constructed in the early 1960s. Commercial power was brought to the station in 1970.

Fishing Point Lighthouse was de-staffed in July 1992 due to automation initiatives. However in July 2002 it was re-staffed again with 4 light keepers. There are currently 3 light keepers at the site.

This information was provided to the town of St. Anthony by the Canadian Coast Guard.

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